Oct 312013
 
Data search before the internet

Data search before the internet

Olive Crazy is a huge fan of information, and not just any information, but information that has been lovingly collected and catalogued.

Information collecting and cataloguing is for the dedicated and studious among us: university students, government and business researchers, and enthusiasts. The more involved I become in the business and culture of olives and olive oil the more appreciative I am of the olive databases I find while rummaging through the internet.

Here are a few of my favorites. I use all of them for my own olive research projects:

Olive Germplasm (cultivars, synonyms, cultivation area, collections, descriptors) database from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the Italian National Research Council, and Italian Institute of Plant Genetics.

DNA molecular markers Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) database from the Italian National Research Council, Italian Institute of Plant Genetics. the University of Cordoba in Spain, and some university I couldn’t identify from its logo.

USDA Agricultural Research Service’s National Plant Germplasm System Germplasm Resource Information Network (GRIN) database (there are two separate links here so make sure to check out both).

The University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program’s Managing Olive Pests and Diseases database.

May the sun shine through your branches.

www.olivecrazy.com

Apr 092012
 

Now let’s go to the west coast of the United States for Sacramento Valley Olive Day. Below is the schedule for the Olive Day educational sessions. As you will see it is full of great information. I’m not sure if there is a registration fee, but as the Boy Scout motto says – be prepared.

The Sacramento Valley Olive Day will be held on Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at the Veterans Memorial Hall, 1620 Solano St, Corning, CA 96021. The event is co-sponsored by Musco Family Olives, Bell Carter Olives, California Olive Ranch, West Coast Olive Products, and the Glenn County Agriculture Commissioner.

7:30 a.m. Registration
8:00 a.m. Agriculture Commissioner Update – Doug Compton, Tehama County Agriculture Commissioners Office
8:20 a.m. Review of Olive Fly Situation at the Canners 2011
8:35 a.m. Olive Pest Management District Updates
8:55 a.m. Olive Fly Control Update – Bill Krueger, UCCE Farm Advisor, Glenn County
9:25 a.m. Mechanical Harvest Update – Louise Ferguson, UCCE Olive Specialist
9:55 a.m. Coffee break
10:15 a.m. Overview of Olive Diseases Including Olive Knot – Elizabeth Fichtner, UCCE Farm Advisor, Tulare County
10:45 a.m. Olive Root Physiology and Root Functions – Joe Connell, UCCE Farm Advisor, Butte County
11:15 a.m. Research Updates: Stem Water Potential, A Tool for Irrigation Scheduling and Monitoring and Mechanical Hedging of Oil Olives – Bill Krueger
11:45 a.m. California Olive Committee Activities – Alexander Ott, Executive Director, California Olive Committee
12:15 p.m. Lunch, courtesy of Musco Family Olives, Bell Carter Olives and California Olive Ranch

 


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May the sun shine through your branches.

www.olivecrazy.com

Mar 162012
 

Last Christmas I wrote an article about a party I attended in Savannah, Georgia and the guests who were factlessly expounding on biodiesel. It was a great opportunity to introduce you to some well-written articles about biodiesel from Dr. Luis F. Razon for The Philippine Star.

Dr. Razon is a full professor of chemical engineering at De La Salle University. His papers on the dynamics and stability of chemically-reacting systems are some of the best-cited papers in chemical engineering literature. He served in the food industry for 14 years, launching several important new products for a major, international, nutritional, products company. He returned to academe in 2001 and is pursuing research in chemical reactor engineering, alternative fuels, and life-cycle assessment.

There are four articles in the series. I can’t do them justice by reprinting them. I will give you the title of the series and of each article, and will provide a link to each article. If you are interested in biodiesel as a fuel consumer or as an olive grower or olive oil producer these articles are a must read. In the modern business world and in the modern olive industry vertical solutions for all challenges from sources to waste streams are imperative.

Biokubo: The search for an alternative feedstock for biodiesel by Dr. Luis F. Razon

(Notes: I cannot find a definition for biokubo but have emailed Dr. Razon and hope to hear from him soon. You will read references to a plant called Jatropha. It is a plant that is being grown in the south Pacific for several reasons including as a biodiesel feedstock.)

Part I. Why do we need an alternative?

Part II. The candidates: Plants and animals

Part III. The candidates: Used cooking oil and microalgae

Part IV. The future

May the sun shine through your branches.

www.olivecrazy.com

Dec 212011
 

I discovered this holiday season that I am on the verge of becoming that terrifying cocktail party attendee known as “The Righteous Bloviator”. The Righteous Bloviator has a greater than average knowledge of certain subjects, looks for opportunities to expound on that knowledge to those even slightly interested, and pompously shuts down commentary from those whom The Righteous Bloviator deems to be of inferior knowledge. While I am not actually a Righteous Bloviator, I know that one lurks inside of me (and most people) waiting to impress others while suppressing uneducated dissent. And just how did I come to this harsh realization about myself?

After reading the articles below and already having a greater than average knowledge of the world of olives and olive oil I stepped forth into the Savannah holiday cocktail party scene (not to be confused with the Savannah daily cocktail party scene). My first stop was to the home of a dear and extremely liberal friend. The Savannah liberal elite were there and most were good and drunk by the time I arrived. I made my way around her home hugging, kissing and searching for someone I could actually stand to talk to for more than a few minutes. At last, with a tolerable Cabernet in hand, I found my target, a well-known and revered restauranteur, who I’ve known since he was none of those things. I sat down with him and his wife and talked about craft beers, food purveyors, good olives, and other topics we enjoy. It was time to refresh our drinks so we split up and headed back to mingle land.

Across from the bar was a crowd of frisky libs all talking loudly and boisterously about Georgia’s recent olive harvest, alternative fuels, and other subjects. As I poured some more tolerable Cab into my glass I cringed at some of the comments uttered and then – The Righteous Bloviator inside me awoke. I whirled and stepped into the midst of the ill-informed to right wrongs and correct inaccuracies.

Okay, I didn’t go nuts and actually caught myself before I was rude and pompous, but it was hard.

Here are links to three very interesting articles printed in The Philippine Star by De La Salle University Professor of Chemical Engineering, Luis F. Razon. The fourth article in the series should be out next week.

Links to his more in depth research are available, as you will see in the articles. I learned a lot from Dr. Razon’s research and other research on biodiesel feedstock I found subsequent to reading Dr. Razon’s articles. Learn, enjoy and watch out for The Righteous Bloviator.

Biokubo: The search for an alternative feedstock for biodiesel

Part I. Why do we need an alternative?

Part II. The candidates: Plants and animals

Part III. The candidates: Used cooking oil and microalgae

May the sun shine through your branches.

www.olivecrazy.com