Olive Crazy: All About Olives and Olive Oil
Oct 312014
 

Turkey in TexasThe Spanish invested in the California Olive Ranch now it looks like the Turkish invested in the Texas Olive Ranch.

Two years ago in 2012, Texas business man, Jim Henry, told the world he planned to plant 300,000 olive trees in Carrizo Springs, Victoria, Texas (the article above says 30,000, so who knows). At that time Jim stated he’d produced extra virgin olive oil from 40,000 trees already in production and wanted to grow the olive industry in Texas.

Today Jim announced that he had transferred ownership of his Texas Olive Ranch to a group of Turkish investors. His announcement accompanied this statement, “I’m not a farmer. I’m not sure what I am.” I’m not sure what that means but Olive Crazy is guessing that even though Jim’s Texas table olive and olive oil vision was real, it was probably more expensive than he wanted to handle.

Regardless of how all this turns out in the end, the most lucrative potential market for extra virgin olive oil is in the United States and the supply of US evoo doesn’t come close to meeting the demand. Currently US olive oil and table olive production is in California. Unfortunately for US consumers California has never produced enough to meet demand. Even worse, the drought conditions in California and persistent olive fly problems have caused a number of California growers to pull out their trees in hopes of growing more profitable crops.

Make no mistake, farming is hard work and the unpredictability is tough for many folks to handle. I certainly don’t blame Jim or any of the California olive growers for their business decisions. I wish them and the US olive industry well.

May the sun shine through your branches.

www.olivecrazy.com

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